Getting Our Minds Ready: 30 Days in 1 Peter

Let’s all take a deep breath together, shall we? The last few weeks have been about as chaotic and crazy a period of time as American culture has seen in my lifetime. I know that those of you who lived through the turbulence of the 1960s may have a deeper perspective on these events, but I was born in 1973, so this has been about the most chaotic I’ve seen it.

Things were pretty turbulent for the young church in the early chapters of Acts, too. In Acts 4, the church is dealing with the aftermath of the healing of the crippled man at the beginning of chapter three. The apostles have been tried by the high priest before the Sanhedrin, threatened, commanded not to preach anymore about Jesus, and released.

What happens next? The church prays! But they don’t just pray for the sick, or ask God to guide, guard, and direct them until the next appointed time… Out of their rich understanding of the Psalms, they pray in the way someone talks out loud in order to try and sort out what’s going on in their head and in their world. From the well of Scripture stored up in their hearts, they draw forth one of the most popular passages of the time, and they let its spirituality explain to them what’s going on and how to respond…

And when they heard it, they lifted their voices together to God and said, “Sovereign Lord, who made the heaven and the earth and the sea and everything in them, who through the mouth of our father David, your servant, said by the Holy Spirit,

“‘Why did the Gentiles rage,
and the peoples plot in vain?
The kings of the earth set themselves,
and the rulers were gathered together,
against the Lord and against his Anointed’—

for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel, to do whatever your hand and your plan had predestined to take place. And now, Lord, look upon their threats and grant to your servants to continue to speak your word with all boldness, while you stretch out your hand to heal, and signs and wonders are performed through the name of your holy servant Jesus.”

They pray Psalm 2:

Why did the Gentiles rage,
and the peoples plot in vain?
The kings of the earth set themselves,
and the rulers were gathered together,
against the Lord and against his Anointed’—

They assign characters to the drama that unfolds in that psalm:

truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel,

And they let the message from God reshape how they see the world:

to do whatever your hand and your plan had predestined to take place.

Because if the REST of Psalm 2 is true (this was a common way of teaching appearing all over the New Testament called REMEZ — quoting part of a passage assuming that the audience will be able to deduce the fuller meaning), then the events swirling around them could not possibly have surprised their Lord. As a powerful writer and teacher wrote yesterday, “God is never afraid. He is never surprised. God’s Kingdom is never threatened. If your faith feels threatened, that’s not the Spirit of God.


One of the apostles in Acts 3-4 who was tried and beaten by the Sanhedrin later wrote a letter to churches experiencing serious upheaval and chaos because of their surrounding culture’s attitude towards their faith in Jesus. I want to spend the next 30 days reading the letter called 1 Peter every day.

Why?

Because in it, the apostle challenges us to, “Get your minds ready for action by being fully sober, and set your hope completely on the grace that will be brought to you when Jesus Christ is revealed.” (1 Pet 1:13 NET)

1 Peter was written for such a time as this, and I know that I need to get my mind right, so that when I pray, I can wholeheartedly and fearlessly ask God — not for safety or comfort or rescue — for the very same thing that those believers in Jerusalem requested:

Lord, look upon their threats and grant to your servants to continue to speak your word with all boldness, while you stretch out your hand to heal, and signs and wonders are performed through the name of your holy servant Jesus.

What do you think? Feel free to post questions or ideas that we might touch on over the next month!

in HIS love,
nick

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About Nick Gill

orphan-poet-adoptee-soldier-prodigal-servant-husband- counselor-desperate seeker after my Father's face "I feel my body weakened by the years as people turn to gods of cruel design. Is it that they fear the pain of death, or is it that they fear the joy of life?" - Toad the Wet Sprocket

Posted on 9 July, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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